More soon. . Ethan has not been innocent in the breakup of the marriage as he had been harboring feelings of distaste for his autistic son with whom he is unable to connect. Hinton's The Outsiders: book summary, chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis courtesy of CliffsNotes. ... At the end of the book, it seems that the Yelnats family curse is lifted. It can be a blissful moment, a painful time, a hopeful dream. She loves Dennis, her husband. Start by marking “The Interestings” as Want to Read: Error rating book. How to Write a Book Summary. It's a word that deserves capitalization: Clitorides, Greek goddess of female pleasure. Author Lydia Denworth is a science journalist who has written about everything from Alzheimer’s to zebrafish. This Study Guide consists of approximately 51 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - It came out years ago and everyone I knew raved about it. Get free homework help on S.E. It would be condescending and untrue to say of Meg Wolitzer that her work just keeps getting better, because it's always good. I would have loved to point him to the nearest green-with-envy evil stepmother/stepsister. I’m not certain what 44 looks like, other than what I’m presented with in the mirror each morning. Overcoming one’s demons is the major theme of the novel The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer. … Maybe not the most technically brilliant book I've ever read, it had that certain quality that comes along very rarely in reading that completely sweeps you off your feet. Here's what occurs to the separate/disparate destinies (that don't always simply intertwine) of the Interestings. The premise of the book is one that is quite familiar: a group of young people develop a strong bond while attending camp together, and the story follows the evolution of their lives and relationships into adulthood. This assumption of huge talent where there may be little or none lies at the heart of Wolitzer’s novel, which sweeps across a span of decades. There's a point in which one of the characters - a highly successful animator Ethan - wonders which Disney character would the protagonist Jules be and concludes that Disney doesn't make princesses like her. The novel touches on a myriad of issues that are relevant in today's world. Stanley Yelnats, a boy who has bad luck due to a curse placed on his great- great-grandfather, is sent to Camp Green Lake, a juvenile detention camp, for a crime he did not commit. A lot of ideas from it still haven’t reached the masses today, but they will – because just like his advice, this book is remarkable. He then proceeds to his narrative. The year is 1974, and Julie, Ash, Goodman, Jonah, Cathy, and Ethan are typical teens with raging hormones, varying artistic talents, and vague dreams of "being someone" in the future. However, by the end of the novel, Jules realizes she was not the person who was ever meant to marry Ethan. This is surely the crown o. Meg Wolitzer’s captivating new novel, set in the bustle and exuberance of New York, is a panoramic and epic drama, but a sleeper kind of epic. This wasn't helped by the audiobook reader doing a good job whenever there was dialog, but rushing dully through the prose. While the main character irked me at times with her jealousy and how unappreciative she was of her own life and talents, the author created her with the saving grace of self-awareness of these traits. She knows that she could have been married to Ethan, living a rich life instead of struggling to get by on what she and Dennis make. Loyalty, Love, and Jealousy: Books on the Complexity of Friendships. You could cease to be obsessed with the idea of being interesting.”, “She recognized that that is how friendships begin: one person reveals a moment of strangeness, and the other person decides just to listen and not exploit it.”, Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Fiction (2013). help you understand the book. I think that I would really enjoy it. Ethan, Jules, Cathy, Goodman, Ash: All believe they are meant for great things. She seems to attach herself to her "best friend" simply because she loves to be around rich people (coming from very limited means herself), but I don't think that was what the author intended. Read full summary on Blinkist . Throughout the book, it is apparent that Ethan loves Jules deeply. The Interestings is about a group of teens who meet in the '70s at an artsy summer camp called Spirit-in … I felt like I was reading this book forever but I did enjoy most of it. To see what your friends thought of this book, I'm about 180 pages into it and am really enjoying it. The book exemplifies the The Interestings is warm, all-American, and acutely perceptive about the feelings and motivations of its characters, male and female, young and old, gay and straight; but it’s also stealthily, unassumingly, and undeniably a novel of ideas. Part 5. The thing you need to know the most? Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. This is surely the crown of Wolitzer’s writing career. This book was not Interesting (capital I or otherwise) in any way. There is a thing lost that we want to recapture. It's fascinating to me that so many people think this is an outstanding piece of writing. Why did I wait so long to read this? The author fails one of my most elementary assessments for my fifth-grade writers: Can you show me what you mean, instead of telling me? Absolutely wonderful. But clitorises is the accepted form. I do have a problem letting go of a book before I find out "what happens," and it's hard to skip ahead on a kindle, so I did read it to the end, but I would not recommend it. He avoids his family, often burying himself in his work. Did anyone find Wolitzer's 'Drama of a Gifted Child' (within "The Interestings") a nod/stab/ode/whatever to Gillian Flynn's 'Amazing Amy" (within "Gone Girl, published about two years earlier? Their group formed initially because they thought they were cooler than everyone else at their exceptionally cool camp, and we never see any better reason for them to be friends. The premise of the book is one that is quite familiar: a group of young people develop a strong bond while attending camp together, and the story follows the evolution of their lives and relationships into adulthood. by Riverhead Books. They're dime a dozen in Disney. On another topic, Jonah, a gay man, tells his story of discovering that he is attracted to men and the trials of a relationship with a man who is HIV positive. They predictably fall behind: herein, pathos. This one especially moved me, maybe because I saw myself in all its characters. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published It's fascinating to me that so many people think this is an outstanding piece of writing. Meg Wolitzer’s captivating new novel, set in the bustle and exuberance of New York, is a panoramic and epic drama, but a sleeper kind of epic. It is only when Jonah tells someone else about his experience that he realizes this adult did not have the ability to take Jonah’s music away completely. Nowadays, my partner Luke and I are adding 3 free book summaries every week. But I wanted to wait until I had a chunk of time to settle into it and enjoy it--and I'm so glad I did. . Summary Plot Overview The giver is written from the point of view of Jonas, an eleven-year-old boy living in a futuristic society that has eliminated all pain, fear, war, and hatred. Wolitzer has a good, often biting sense of humor, which is also adding to my enjoyment. Jules, meanwhile, struggles with her jealousy of Ethan and Ash. The most effusive 5 star rating i have given in a while...this is another "book coma" one for me, where i am gonna have to take a few days off from reading because I'm going to be pissed off at any book that isn't this book for some time. That's the story of Jules Jacobson, the heroine of Meg Wolitzer's newest novel. What's so interesting about these self-proclaimed 'interestings'?" As they find their places in life, the six deal with their downfalls, prejudices, fears, and insecurities. If you are drawn to human drama, you’ll soon be thoroughly hooked. Considering this book is from 2003 is mind-boggling. If you are drawn to human drama, you’ll soon be thoroughly hooked. I spent thousands of hours writing these. But every member of that group of artsy folk, their decisions, shape what ultimately becomes the final picture-- engineering their fates in compelling and irrefutable ways. Ethan, Jules, Cathy, Goodman, Ash: All believe they are meant for great things. The most exciting moment came when I rushed to my dictionary to check on the correct plural form for clitoris. That’s more than one per day! What do you think so far? As … Meg Wolitzer’s ninth novel, The Interestings, is the story of a group of friends who met as teenagers and traces their lives into adulthood.